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I started this blog to help my matches on FamilyTreeDNA and 23andMe. DNA testing has the potential to reunite long lost cousins but there are lots of barriers that impede this process and this blog attempts to help overcome them.


Trying to keep things simple whilst also achieving a requisite level of scientific accuracy is a challenge. As a result these pages are likely to undergo a continuous process of editing and refinement.

Use the menu to the right to go to your topic of interest.

And if you have any questions or comments, please do get in touch.

Other sources of information which you may find useful include the following:
  1. ISOGG Wiki page on autosomal DNA
  2. DNA testing for genealogy - getting started Part 3: autosomal DNA by CeCe Moore, Geni.com blog, 1 August 2012
  3. Autosomal DNA by Angela J. Cone
  4. Ask a geneticist by Dr. Erin Cline Davis, a science writer at 23andMe
  5. The atDNA gamble: playing the odds by Judy G. Russell
  6. FamilyTreeDNA's FAQ page relating to autosomal DNA testing

11 comments:

  1. Hi, I am a student in Ireland currently studying history. I am doing a project on Irish slavery. I have chosen this topic because I am very interested and fascinated about it. I have recently watched a presentation you have done on this topic on YouTube. For my project I need two sources which both have to be a recognised history book, I was just wondering if you knew of any I could try get hold of and use for my project ?

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    Replies
    1. Try these:
      Ireland, Slavery, and Anti-Slavery; Nini Rodgers
      If the Irish Ran the World; Don Akenson

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  2. Hello Maurice. I attended your "What's New in Irish Records" presentation in Toronto at the OGS conference last week and it was highly informative. Have you had a chance to post the presentation slides? Perhaps I am looking in the wrong place?

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  3. I am so happy to find your blog while exploring my X matches. I know I get my MTdna from my mother but my X chromosome is very similar to father's brother's X chromosome, which comes from Catherine Devereux. I think my 8th great grandmother was Anna Gleason, daughter of Thomas, who lived in Massachusetts in the mid-1600s. Here is the line: Gleason, Gibbs (late 1600s), Aikens (1700s,) Nash (early 1800s), and Devereux(1820s to early 1900s). Can you shed any light on this? I have confirmed DNA match with a Nash (3rdGG). Is there any hope of finding an earlier match?

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    Replies
    1. Irish records tend to peter out around 1800. There is a chance you will be able to go back further but only if you are very lucky, for example, if they were gentry.

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  4. Hi Maurice. Great Blog! My mother's mother (now deceased) was adopted and my mother has had no luck with the local authorities in getting information on her mother's situation. Which DNA test do think would give my mother the most information about her origins?

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    Replies
    1. Try an autosomal DNA test. If you think her parents were American, do Ancestry; if they were Irish or British, do FTDNA. Upload the raw data to Gedmatch. If there are no close matches, test with all 3 major companies - Ancestry, FTDNA, 23andme.

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  5. Hi Maurice,
    Can you please tell me, if I have a X chromosome match to someone on Gedmatch, does that mean we are related on my mother's side, or my matches' mother's side, or both?
    I am an adopted middle aged woman seeking to find any blood relatives. I have exhausted all the search methods and am now entirely relying on DNA. My closest match, reference above, is a female third cousin, approx. 3.2 generations apart.
    Thank you in advance for reading my note. I'll await your reply.

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    Replies
    1. Have a read of this blog post ... http://dnaandfamilytreeresearch.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/analysing-dna-matches-step-32-x-dna.html

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